On the back deck, off a side street in Bay Ridge, Jason Gots is smokin’. I arrive at hour 4 or 6 in the process, depending on where we start counting. Six hours ago, Jason got out the chicken for today’s meal, and gave it all a good rub down of spices, including turbinado sugar, salt, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne pepper, paprika, and black pepper. (Yep, that’s why we call it a “rub”.)  As it heats, the rub then creates what smokers call “a bark”: the sugar melts and caramelizes to form a dark, crusty coating on the meat.

Four hours ago, he fired up his Stainless Steel Bradley Smoker, a highly-pleasing and oft-used gift from his wife, Demet. With the temperature set to around 250F, he loaded the smoker’s canister with Jim Beam bisquettes, chips made from old whiskey barrels. The chips are slowly burned down into the smoker, which has a tray of water at the bottom to create moist, flavorful air as the chicken smokes. The result of these labors for our dinner crew?  Nothing short of poultry divinity.

Next weekend, for his annual family reunion, Jason plans to smoke pulled pork. We all know the desire to look good for the generations that proceed us, so he’s going to leave it all on the smoking stage. He’ll start with a marinade for the pork, then a give it rub, and then a “mop”: a drippy BBQ sauce for slowly basting the pork in the smoker. “The pork will be cooked to crispy, caramelized, chewy perfection over 14 hours, and the Manis family may never be the same,” says Jason.

The Bisquettes

The Bisquettes

At Hour Four in the Smoker

At Hour Four in the Smoker

It Was That Good

It Was That Good

Advertisements